10 String Lyre Harp

- Dec 31, 2018-

10-string Lyre Harp. The sturdy walnut body is suitable for the soft and soft curves of this banjo. Ten metal strings provide classic sound enhanced by classic spruce soundboards. When you don’t play, you can hang it as a piece of art; it’s great.


Accessories include:

Harp Tuning Tool, Small (code HPTS); Gig Bag; and additional string sets.

Play: Pull it up on your knees or while pulling, pull the sides of the strings out. Or lay it flat and unplug it.


History and Adjustment:

In the early Middle Eastern Eastern Europe, the secularization of Jewish worship music led to Klezmer music. The Jewish poetry, known as klezmorim, makes music a place in weddings and other Valentine’s Days (joy events). Klezmer music eventually blends the rhythm and rhythm of Slavic, Greek, Turkish, Gypsy and even American jazz. For Klezmer Music, try the Misheberakh model: E F#G A#B C#D E F#G.


Spruce Wood 10 String Lyre HarpSpruce Wood 10 String Lyre Harp 2


The solid lace wood body fits the soft and soft curves of this banjo. Ten metal strings provide classic sound enhanced by classic spruce soundboards. When you don’t play, you can hang it as a piece of art, it is so beautiful. Includes adjustment tools. Pull it upside down on your knees or while walking, pull the sides of the string. Or, lay it flat and unplug it. 8.25 inches wide, 16 inches long, 2.75 inches deep. Here are some suggestions for adjustment:


This is a true tuning from Jewish worship music, in which the instrument is used to accompany Chazzan’s singing, also known as Cantor. This adjustment method uses the Chazzanut mode; the adjustment from the bass (maximum string) is as follows: D E F G#A B C D E F.


In the early Middle Ages of Eastern Europe, the secularization of Jewish worship music led to Klezmer music. The Jewish poetry, known as klezmorim, makes music a place in weddings and other Valentine’s Days (joy events). Klezmer music eventually blends the rhythm and rhythm of Slavic, Greek, Turkish, Gypsy and even American jazz. For Klezmer music, try the Misheberakh mode: E F#G A#B C#D E F#G


Two alternative tuning methods work well with the comfort singer in the G key (again, bass to treble): E F#G A B C D E F#G and D E F#G A B C D E F# (E is a tonic). Note that in the second adjustment, all notes are the same, but you start with D instead of E. Includes tuning tools, padded performance packs and additional string groups.



Edit by Bonnie

Height Musical Instrument Co.,ltd